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Teachers/Parents

Learning to read [cartoon] | Ebook Friendly

Via Ebook Friendly via Learning to read [cartoon] | Ebook Friendly.

Online Vision Screening Check

Online Vision Screening Check

Momsread.com is all about reading and education, so it’s only natural to urge all of our readers to take precautions to preserve their sight and promote eye health. Impaired vision directly affects a students ability to absorb information in the classroom, and early detection of eyesight problems is crucial. Eye exams can also detect signs […]

15 Grammar Goofs That Make You Look Silly

Thanks to Copyblogger.com for the Infographic on grammar goofs. Like this infographic? Get more copywriting tips from Copyblogger.

When Books Fly, Wikipedia Homework, Why Online Education?

When Books Fly, Wikipedia Homework, Why Online Education?

Watch the 15 minute short film, “The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore (2011).” Click this link to go to Skip Prichard’s (@SkipPrichard) blog post, When Books Fly: Lessons from Lessmore | Skip Prichard Leadership Insight.  The story in the film is so fantastic and well-produced that I wanted to pass it on. The short […]

GEMSS and Knewton, Genetic Education and SAT Prep

GEMSS and Knewton, Genetic Education and SAT Prep

The Genetic Education Materials for School Success is a website you will want to bookmark if you are a teacher or a parent of children with a genetic disorder. Down Syndrome, MCAD, Fagile X, PKU, Sickle Cell Disease, VLCAD, Williams Syndrome are among the disorders covered. The site is specifically designed “…to promote awareness of and education about […]

Making Manuscripts with Muppet Magic

Making Manuscripts with Muppet Magic

Recently, I took my parents and my children to see the new Muppet movie, The Muppets, and those Muppet puppets really took me back to the good old days when I was in high school.  Puppets and yes, The Muppets, heavily influenced my interest in writing.  That was back in the days of church buses […]

Three Fun Reflections on the English Language

I’ve been trying, with limited success, to participate in Nanowrimo this month.  My extracurricular activity has really cut into my blogging time, but since I write in English (the American version), I want to pay tribute to the weirdest, most difficult language on Earth by sharing some great links.  Teachers, especially those who teach English […]

Open Letter to Brian McGreevy – Swiss Cheese Approach to YA Books

Open Letter to Brian McGreevy – Swiss Cheese Approach to YA Books

Dear Mr. McGreevy, Your recent post “Why teens should read adult fiction” is as full of holes as Swiss cheese – the kind you discover lurking at the back of the refrigerator – and it also doesn’t pass the smell test. Perhaps the YA category is a “marketing distinction”, but more importantly, it describes a […]

A Shout Out to Teachers

A Shout Out to Teachers

In the Houston area where I live, there doesn’t seem to be much to celebrate in the world of public education: a major budget crisis, staffing cuts, and record unemployment.  However, I would like to acknowledge the teachers who are on the front lines this year, regardless of where they work.  Teaching is the hardest […]

Getting Excited About August Camp NaNoWriMo

Getting Excited About August Camp NaNoWriMo

I’m so pleased that the great folks at NaNoWriMo have developed Camp NaNoWriMo for those of us who love a high adventure writing experience to brighten up our summer.  Thanks guys! NaNoWriMo, which stands for National Novel Writing Month, began way back in July, 1999 in the San Fransisco Bay Area.  This event, held every […]

Paranormal Normal

Paranormal Normal

One balmy night in June, 2008, I was on the top bunk in a large room-full of bunk beds in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, getting ready for lights out.  My neighbor, Kim, the mother of two older teenage daughters had her nose buried in Twilight. Another chaperone on our mission trip asked her why she was reading […]

One last time on “Darkness Too Visible”

One last time on “Darkness Too Visible”

The Wall Street Journal posted a video interview to follow-up on the reaction to Meghan Cox Gurdon’s article, “Darkness Too Visible”.  Maybe it’s just me, but the interview came across as a damage control effort.  They didn’t even include Ms. Gurdon in the interview. NPR, on the other hand,  posted the audio and transcript of […]

How to Turn Your Son into a Reader

How to Turn Your Son into a Reader

“How can I get my son to read?  Anything.  Anything would be better than nothing at all.” This question comes up over and over in conversations between teachers and the parents of boys, beginning in elementary school and growing in stridency as boys reach middle school and get the label “reluctant readers”. Number One Rule:  […]

Another Take on “Darkness Too Visible”

Another Take on “Darkness Too Visible”

As a follow up to my last post on Ms. Gurdon’s article, “Darkness Too Visible”, published on June 4, 2011 in the Wall Street Journal, I would like to refer you to a blog post by Deren Hansen, “Gurdon’s ‘Darkness Too Visible:’ A Call for Variety“. His take on the conflict seemed insightful and balanced, and […]

YA Fiction Accused of Making the ‘Darkness Too Visible’

YA Fiction Accused of Making the ‘Darkness Too Visible’

Recently, I read two articles about teen and young adult fiction which highlight the deep divide between an industry’s direction and parents’ expectations. The first article, “Darkness Too Visible” by Meghan Cox Gurdon, published on 6/4/11 in the Wall Street Journal, has incited a firestorm of defensive comments by YA authors and readers alike.  At the […]